Burma cultural tour, Yangon and Mandalay

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Check dates, prices & availability

19 Dec 2016
£ 3195
excluding flights
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Click here to enquire about or book the 19 Dec 2016 departure
15 Jan 2017
£ 3250
excluding flights
Click here to enquire about or book the 15 Jan 2017 departure
12 Mar 2017
£ 3250
excluding flights
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08 Oct 2017
£ 3250
excluding flights
Click here to enquire about or book the 08 Oct 2017 departure
12 Nov 2017
£ 3250
excluding flights
Click here to enquire about or book the 12 Nov 2017 departure
03 Dec 2017
£ 3250
excluding flights
Click here to enquire about or book the 03 Dec 2017 departure
Holiday type

Small group cultural tours

Typically you will be sharing your experiences with between 4-20 like minded travellers (depending on the trip, operator and how many others are booked on the trip) and you'll have a group leader with you. Whether you are travelling alone or with friends it's good value, and a great way to meet new people! While itineraries are pre-planned there is some flexibility and you'll have plenty of privacy. This trip will appeal to travellers of all ages who enjoy meeting new people as well as experiencing new cultures.

Responsible tourism

Responsible tourism: Burma cultural tour, Yangon and Mandalay


We help you to make a difference; all our flights are off-set by ‘Carbon-Clear;’ this balances out the emissions given out on your flights with the equivalent reductions in greenhouse gas reductions in another place. In Myanmar, we use a minibus rather than multiple jeeps for transport, thus also reducing C02 emissions.

We believe that small group size is imperative, and for this destination, we currently only offer 4 group tours with a maximum size of 12 pax per trip. Not only does this allow us to use the road less travelled for a more unique experience, but it also helps to minimise our effect on the environment.

From the very start of this and every trip, we make it clear that clients should ensure they leave no litter, and to be courteous to all locals, respecting local culture. In order to reduce the amount of plastic wastage, we also encourage clients to carry refillable water bottles.


We have always believed that we should run all our trips in as responsible a manner as possible and let our clients decide for themselves if they wish to visit a certain country or not. Up until November, Myanmar (Burma) was accused of multiple human rights violations, the ruling military junta was thought to be beyond the pale, and an unofficial tourist boycott was in place. But at the end of last year, elections (albeit rigged ones) were held, the generals handed power to a ‘civilianised’ government and released Aung San Suu Kyi, the democratically elected leader, from house arrest. She then dropped her opposition to tourism, arguing that as long as it is done responsibly, tourism can be a positive stance for change. It is important to encourage tourism in Myanmar in the right way so that the local people, and not the corrupt and unelected government, make the most out of the presence of tourism. We feel that isolating Myanmar from the rest of the world gives the government carte blanche to operate in any way it chooses. By sending in more eyes and ears (in the form of tourists), the government becomes more accountable. Aung San Suu Kyi has recently made this same point.

But how easy is it to travel responsibly? How does the ethical traveller make sure the money they are spending reaches ordinary people of Myanmar? Before launching our programme to the country, we went to find out. We found that ordinary Myanmar people certainly benefit from our presence, and were keen that we came. Whether this was one of the friendly touts trying to sell everything from a Buddha’s heads to grasshoppers, tonga drivers, local guides, boatmen, drivers or just the staff employed by the hotels and restaurants, it was very obvious there were plenty of ordinary people making a living out of tourism. Over the last three years, two of our most experienced guides have travelled to Myanmar on a number of occasions and came back with glowing reports of the country. They informed us of ways to run trips that put a minimum of finance into the coffers of the government, and a great deal into the hands of the ordinary people.

In Myanmar, we have been especially careful to use privately owned hotels, and that all staff are private individuals. Great care is taken to make sure the hotels we use are not owned and run for the government’s own ends, or by their stooges, and are either owned by international chains or local businessmen, unaligned to the government. We will also be staying with a local community in Hsipaw and visiting many cottage industries, with the opportunity for people to purchase items and directly benefit the local people. There is no question in our mind that by using local, independent guides, the positive aspects of the experience for the tourist are greatly increased, as they can arrange all manner of cultural exchanges. Through the purchasing of locally made handicrafts, fruits, and curiosities - which the guide encourages - in turn adds to the benefit of the local population. In addition the money paid to the local guide goes directly in their pockets and from them in to the local community.

Our company has grown up on the premise of encouraging local interaction that benefits both the tourist and the local. In Myanmar, we have all manner of cultural exchanges, probably the most notable being the involvement of our clients in the novice monks acceptance ceremony into the local monastery, which the tour sponsors; we pay for orphaned children to be integrated into the monastery, a practice all children want to follow but those without families struggle to achieve. We also make a substantial donation from each trip to a school for children that were orphaned by the cyclone in 2008. There is no doubt in our minds that the vast majority of Myanmar people want tourists to visit and it is clear that a huge number of ordinary civilians, both directly and indirectly, benefit, from our presence.

It can be argued staying away leaves the country and its people more isolated and vulnerable. We believe that a successful trip not only delivers a unique and unsurpassable journey for our clients, but that it also benefits the peoples whose lands we are privileged to visit.

Reviews of Burma cultural tour, Yangon and Mandalay

You can trust Responsible Travel reviews because, unlike many other schemes, reviews can ONLY be written by people who we have verified have been on the holidays.

I am reborn! Simply the best holiday I have ever been on
Some great stories to tell the grandchildren. Would recommend to a friend
Very enjoyable
It was OK
A bit disappointing really

Reviewed on 20 Dec 2012 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?

Coming across by chance a house warming and monk blessing in village house on an island near Bagan. We were invited into the upstairs room for the ceremony and then back to join them for the celebratory lunch afterwards.

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?

Look into the wide variety of options for sight seeing and experiences away from the main tourist route. It's all very safe; extremely interesting and the people are very welcoming.

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?

Yes I think so. We used local companies and local guides. We had lunch in village houses many days and we visited many local craft businesses.

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?

Exellent. It was one of the most interesting countries we have visited. It offers an enormous variety for the visitor. From ancient relics to fine buildings to a rural way of life which goes back centuries.
It is wonderful to see a country where the people are so resourceful in using the natural resources and who waste nothing in the process of making almost all of what is necessary for their needs.
They are a fairly repressed yet humble race who seem to have accepted the awful atrocities of the past and are hopeful of the future.
We have a lots to learn from them.

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