Burma cultural tour, Yangon and Mandalay

Travel by air, rail and the Irrawaddy River on this two week small group tour of Burma. Colonial heritage and Buddhism on the road to Mandalay.
Yangon (Rangoon) Heho Pindaya caves Kalaw hill station Lake Inle Kakku Mandalay Ava and Amarapura Sagaing Monywa Irrawaddy River cruise to Bagan Bagan temples Kyun Thiri Island
Price
£3225To£3595 excluding flights
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Duration
14 Days
Type
Small group
Reviews
More info
Price includes all activities/equipment, tour leaders, local guides and drivers, meals, transport (excluding international flights), accommodation and entrance fees as outlined in the itinerary. Optional Single Supplement: £685
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Description of Burma cultural tour, Yangon and Mandalay

Any travellers wishing to discover a side to Southeast Asia that’s about as far removed from the typical backpacker trail as you can hope to imagine, should try a cultural tour of Burma.

This two week tour starts and completes amongst the glittering pagodas of Yangon (formerly Rangoon) and features an exciting itinerary leading from Heho and Lake Inle to beautiful Bagan via a cruise on the Irrawaddy River.

From Yangon to Mandalay, this is your chance to explore a land that was once out of reach to travellers and as such provides fascinating insight into both Buddhism and colonial era heritage.

Burma invites an authentic Southeast Asian experience with an untouched world of jungles, temples, and hill stations all featuring on an all-encompassing cultural tour far removed from the bright lights over the border.

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Price information

£3225To£3595 excluding flights
Convert currency:
Price includes all activities/equipment, tour leaders, local guides and drivers, meals, transport (excluding international flights), accommodation and entrance fees as outlined in the itinerary. Optional Single Supplement: £685
Make enquiry

Check dates, prices & availability

Travel guides

Over 50s
First things first. The author of this guide has passed the 50 mark and, like most travellers, doesn’t feel any different about travel. 18-30 clubbing...
Myanmar (Burma)
Myanmar's decades of isolation have meant that its unique ways of life have remained largely intact. Visitors are astounded by what the Myanmars can c...

Holiday information

Small group tour:
Small group travel is not large group travel scaled down. It is modelled on independent travel – but with the advantage of a group leader to take care of the itinerary, accommodation and tickets, and dealing with the language. It’s easy to tick off the big sights independently – but finding those one-off experiences, local festivals, travelling markets and secret viewpoints is almost impossible for someone without the insider knowledge gained from years in the field. Those with a two-week holiday, a small group tour will save valuable planning time.
Pricing:
The currency converter above works on today’s interbank exchange rate. We do take bookings in a variety of currencies, but the rates are often set months in advance and may therefore differ from those shown above which are for guidance purposes only. Please enquire for details.

Reviews

1 Reviews of Burma cultural tour, Yangon and Mandalay

5 out of 5 stars
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Reviewed on 20 Dec 2012 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


Coming across by chance a house warming and monk blessing in village house on an island near Bagan. We were invited into the upstairs room for the ceremony and then back to join them for the celebratory lunch afterwards.

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Look into the wide variety of options for sight seeing and experiences away from the main tourist route. It's all very safe; extremely interesting and the people are very welcoming.

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?


Yes I think so. We used local companies and local guides. We had lunch in village houses many days and we visited many local craft businesses.

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


Exellent. It was one of the most interesting countries we have visited. It offers an enormous variety for the visitor. From ancient relics to fine buildings to a rural way of life which goes back centuries.
It is wonderful to see a country where the people are so resourceful in using the natural resources and who waste nothing in the process of making almost all of what is necessary for their needs.
They are a fairly repressed yet humble race who seem to have accepted the awful atrocities of the past and are hopeful of the future.
We have a lots to learn from them.

Responsible Travel

As the pioneers of responsible tourism, we've screened this (and every) holiday so that you can travel knowing it will help support the places and people that you visit, and the planet. Read how below.

Planet

We believe that small group size is imperative, and for this destination, we currently only offer 4 group tours with a maximum size of 12 pax per trip. Not only does this allow us to use the road less travelled for a more unique experience, but it also helps to minimise our effect on the environment.

From the very start of this and every trip, we make it clear that clients should ensure they leave no litter, and to be courteous to all locals, respecting local culture. In order to reduce the amount of plastic wastage, we also encourage clients to carry refillable water bottles.

People

We have always believed that we should run all our trips in as responsible a manner as possible and let our clients decide for themselves if they wish to visit a certain country or not. Up until November, Myanmar (Burma) was accused of multiple human rights violations, the ruling military junta was thought to be beyond the pale, and an unofficial tourist boycott was in place. But at the end of last year, elections (albeit rigged ones) were held, the generals handed power to a ‘civilianised’ government and released Aung San Suu Kyi, the democratically elected leader, from house arrest. She then dropped her opposition to tourism, arguing that as long as it is done responsibly, tourism can be a positive stance for change. It is important to encourage tourism in Myanmar in the right way so that the local people, and not the corrupt and unelected government, make the most out of the presence of tourism. We feel that isolating Myanmar from the rest of the world gives the government carte blanche to operate in any way it chooses. By sending in more eyes and ears (in the form of tourists), the government becomes more accountable. Aung San Suu Kyi has recently made this same point.

But how easy is it to travel responsibly? How does the ethical traveller make sure the money they are spending reaches ordinary people of Myanmar? Before launching our programme to the country, we went to find out. We found that ordinary Myanmar people certainly benefit from our presence, and were keen that we came. Whether this was one of the friendly touts trying to sell everything from a Buddha’s heads to grasshoppers, tonga drivers, local guides, boatmen, drivers or just the staff employed by the hotels and restaurants, it was very obvious there were plenty of ordinary people making a living out of tourism. Over the last three years, two of our most experienced guides have travelled to Myanmar on a number of occasions and came back with glowing reports of the country. They informed us of ways to run trips that put a minimum of finance into the coffers of the government, and a great deal into the hands of the ordinary people.

In Myanmar, we have been especially careful to use privately owned hotels, and that all staff are private individuals. Great care is taken to make sure the hotels we use are not owned and run for the government’s own ends, or by their stooges, and are either owned by international chains or local businessmen, unaligned to the government. We will also be staying with a local community in Hsipaw and visiting many cottage industries, with the opportunity for people to purchase items and directly benefit the local people. There is no question in our mind that by using local, independent guides, the positive aspects of the experience for the tourist are greatly increased, as they can arrange all manner of cultural exchanges. Through the purchasing of locally made handicrafts, fruits, and curiosities - which the guide encourages - in turn adds to the benefit of the local population. In addition the money paid to the local guide goes directly in their pockets and from them in to the local community.

Our company has grown up on the premise of encouraging local interaction that benefits both the tourist and the local. In Myanmar, we have all manner of cultural exchanges, probably the most notable being the involvement of our clients in the novice monks acceptance ceremony into the local monastery, which the tour sponsors; we pay for orphaned children to be integrated into the monastery, a practice all children want to follow but those without families struggle to achieve. We also make a substantial donation from each trip to a school for children that were orphaned by the cyclone in 2008. There is no doubt in our minds that the vast majority of Myanmar people want tourists to visit and it is clear that a huge number of ordinary civilians, both directly and indirectly, benefit, from our presence.

It can be argued staying away leaves the country and its people more isolated and vulnerable. We believe that a successful trip not only delivers a unique and unsurpassable journey for our clients, but that it also benefits the peoples whose lands we are privileged to visit.

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