Nepal trek with Chitwan National Park safari

“A perfect balance of walking and culture, this Nepalese adventure combines city tours and ancient sights with days spent trekking across remote landscapes.”

Highlights

Kathmandu | Pasupatinath temple | Patan | Bhaktapur | Budhanil-Kantha | Chisapani | Nagarkot | Dhulikhel | Pokhara | Namo Buddha site | Panauti | Royal Chitwan National Park | Jungle and river safari | Bird-watching tour | Fewa Lake

Description of Nepal trek with Chitwan National Park safari

This beautiful valley trek lets you delve Nepal's rich cultural traditions, flora and fauna, stunning vistas, along with typical village life.

Begin with an exploration of Nepal's ancient historical fabric, including the famous Pasupatinath temple sacred to both Hindu and Buddhists, Boudhananth Stupa, Sywambhunath and Kathmandu's Durbar-square. You'll also visit Patan Ė hailed as the 'city of art and beauty' Ė plus Bhaktapur, famed for its traditional wood carving. At the end of your trip, there is time in the beautiful nature-filled city of Pokhara, home to the World Peace Stupa Ė plus a chance to go boating on Fewa Lake.

Trekking days put you inside Nepal's unforgettable landscape, with day hikes to Chisapani, Nagarkot, Dhulikhel, Panauti plus the sacred Buddhist site of Namo, where lord Buddha reputedly saved the life of a tiger dying from hunger by giving him his flesh.

Transferring to the Royal Chitwan National Park, you will explore one of Asia's best wildlife havens. A combination of jungle and river safaris offer a chance to see rhinoceros, four species of deer, two types of crocodiles, sloth bear, leopards, Royal Bengal Tiger Ė plus, with the help of an expert guide, over 450 species of exotic birds.

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Departure information

This trip can be tailor made throughout the year to suit your requirements
Vouchers
Accepted
Holiday type

Travelling with a local operator

This holiday is operated by a company based in the holiday destination and they will be able to provide expert local knowledge. They will be able to tailor make your holiday to suit your requirements not only concerning the dates of travel but also typically the standard of accommodation, and thus price. It is rare for local operators to be able to help with the booking of your flights.

Responsible tourism

Nepal trek with Chitwan National Park safari

Carbon reduction

Your holiday will help support local people and conservation. We must also reduce CO2. Learn about the CO2 emissions of this holiday and how to reduce them.

Environment

Our trekking company is wholly committed to responsible tourism. On our treks & tours, tourism helps improve the standard of living for the local people by generating income for the local community through purchasing of local products such as fresh fruits, handloom products, meat, drinks, and fresh vegetables and providing job opportunities.

We employ well-trained & experienced local guides and hire local porters whose load limit is 20-25kg. Our guides will give a briefing about responsible tourism e.g. rubbish disposal, giving food scraps to domestic animals, paying the porters to carry out trash, using a fire pit when camping, not picking flowers, using kerosene instead of firewood, avoiding bathing/washing clothes in streams, using local tea houses or camping sites. In addition the small group size of 4-10 people helps to minimise the impact on the environment.

On this trek, we stay at local tea houses and lodges operated by local communities such as Chisapani trekking lodge, Balthali Resort and High-view Resort. These lodges minimise the impact on the environment by using kerosene/gas fuel instead of fire wood and disposing of their rubbish appropriately.

Our trekking company provides financial donations for the local school (US $2 per visitor) & health post (US $3 per visitor). We provide educational materials for students such as copies, pencils, ball pens and sports equipment (foot balls, basket balls), and provide equipment & medicines for the health post such as tablets, eye drops, high-altitude tablets, plasters and bandages. We also support the Kvresthali Women society with financial donations (US $5 per visitor) which provides education for impoverished adult women and provides funds for goat and vegetables farming and road repair.

On this trip, our guests will have the opportunity to give donations to these causes, and visit the Kavresthali Women Society to observe their activities.

14 Reviews of Nepal trek with Chitwan National Park safari

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Reviewed on 16 Oct 2018 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


The 5 days walking through villages and montains where we had a close contact with local people and nature.

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Some trekkings may be a bit longer than you expect but they are really amazing especially the one of balthali. You will see a lot of trash but it really didn't matter to us. Be aware with the food and water to drink and prefer the local food, the delicious Dal baht and momo, which is always fresh. Bring some extra money to give tips and to buy some local produts.

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?


Yes, I felt. We stayed in small hotels and almost all of them are managed by locals and we ate in simple restaurants in the villages. Nepal is a very poor country still under reconstrution and tourism is very important for them. They are making an huge effort to preserve natural spaces and Chitwan is a good exemple. They are also trying to reduce the use of plastics.

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


Definitly Nepal is not just Himalayas. Nepali are used to tourism and know how to make tourists feel well. It met our expetations. The well trained guides, the drivers, all the agency staff, the operator, made that possible.

Reviewed on 25 Sep 2018 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


The last accomodation in the hills in the trek

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


The trek on kathmandu valley is not worth it, there is rubbish everywhere

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?


Yes

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


5

Reviewed on 06 Dec 2017 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


Too many memorable moments to mention - the people, the splendour of the mountain views, relaxing in the Garden of Dreams, the bustle of the streets of Thamel, and sights in and around Kathmandu. The trekking, the sight of Rhino, Crocodiles and lovely Sambar Deer at Chitwan. Pasaputinath and the atmosphere around the riverside ghats.

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Check it suits what you are looking for. Be aware there are some long journeys and the roads are poor. Be aware things may not always go to plan. You might want to be advised of your accommodation in advance. Standards will not be what you expect in the west - though I had no issues with the places we
stayed.

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?


I think/hope so. It is a local company. All staff are local people. Local people work in hotels and restaurants. We used local places to eat on the trek which
was nice. We bought goods and gifts from local shops.

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


A good trip and ideal for first time visitors/trekkers. Good value compared to big companies. I really enjoyed it.

Reviewed on 18 Apr 2017 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


The whole holiday was memorable, however I especially enjoyed the trekking and being able to see the 'real' Nepal away from the city.

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Be prepared to be flexible with the itinerary! I did not get to see all the sites I was expecting to around Kathmandu, but the unexpected things I did e.g. the visit to the school and the local village, showed how people are living and still recovering from the 2015 earthquake. Do not expect all the luxuries we take for granted at home.

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?


Most definitely! During the trekking part of my holiday, a local guide and porters were used. We stopped at local teahouses both during the day and overnight.

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


Fantastic!

Reviewed on 13 Mar 2017 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


There were just too many memorable moments to pick one. I loved the trekking and seeing the ordinary local life, and I loved learning about a different culture and philosophies.

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Do take a torch and don't bother with much clothing - we washed clothes and hung it over our rucksacks during the trek - it dries super fast!
Having a book really helped me get through the long journeys between Kathmandu/Chitwan/Pokhara. There are some lovely bookshops in Kathmandu worth visiting!
Do take extra money for tips for your guide, porter and driver.

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?


I hope so!

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


I loved every bit of it - the challenges and sweat during the trekking, the incredible kindness and patience of local people, Achut's care, flexibility to change our plans if we wanted to, the way he and his team handled our trip was amazing, we felt safe and looked after. This holiday taught me many things about the country and its people I would have no way of knowing otherwise.

Reviewed on 07 Jan 2016 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


Trekking through the mountains.

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Be ready to move around a lot, pack lightly and don't forget sunscreen :)

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?


Yes, people in Nepal count a lot on tips which in this time is a great help for people. After the earthquake and with the border being closed from India's side Nepal really needs people to come and visit. A lot of hotels were empty and you coming to visit plays a great role. Nepal is very conscious about plastic which i find great. I kept filling up my water bottle and tried to make sure i dispose of all plastic appropriately.

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


It was absolutely great. The company took the greatest care in order to provide a diverse and fun holiday. I think it would be perfect for groups and solo travelers (I went solo).
The tour combines city excursions and trekking in the first half where the second half includes jungle attractions, bird watching, cultural performances and more city excursions. I would recommend this tour to anyone wanting great diversity and fun.
All the staff were very friendly and welcoming. I was really sad to leave.

Reviewed on 29 Nov 2014 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


So many ! To mention a few : The monkey temple , full of michevious monkeys and Hindu temple Kathmandu (moving experience to witness cremations by side of river).Durbar square , boxing match , political rally and film being filmed , -all happening simultaneously to backdrop of magnificent temples .
Exhilarating white water rafting enroute to Chitwan National park , one of most
fascinating road trips , a cinematographic experience played out over 7 hours with Nepalese life played out in spectacular color at the side of the road , against scenic backdrop .
Chitwan :meandering by boat while crocodiles loitered by the banks and white rhino ambled about , a birdwatchers paradise .
Mesmerising elephant ride through the jungle watching out for hidden tigers / no dragons . (Did see fresh tiger prints though ) .
Pokhora: charming laid back scenic lakeside resort with Himalayas as back drop , pretty as a picture , with great lakeside cafes , bars , a peaceful gem . rise early to watch sunrise over Himalayas and take a hike up to world peace stupa , with its wonderful views .
Then onto Tibet : Lhasa , an eclectic mix of new world China , modern glitz , contrasted with old world Tibet , a fascinating synergy. Potala palace , has to be one of the most awesome palaces in the world . Jokhang temple with The religios fervor of its devotees , prostrating for hours outside temple , amid scent of incense and yak butter candles , quite a spectacle to behold . the debating
courtyard at Sera monastery, was another memorable experience .Our road trip from Lhasa to Kathmandu , incorporating Everest base Camp Tibet , was an epic journey along the friendship highway incorporating jaw dropping scenery , the most unusual , varied topography against the bluest sky imaginable , stunning Yamdrok-tso lake , via Gyantse , Shigatse ( visit the Tashilhunpo monastery
seat of the Panchen lamas ) , eventually reaching the awe inspiring base of Everest . returning onto Kathmandu by road sees the landscape change to lusher , greener more tropical topography . An incredible journey, and that's the edited version!

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Book your flight , pack your bag , seize the day , go ! just do it !

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?


Yes , I would like to think we supported the local economy , provided employment for porters , guides , drivers .

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


A wonderful , magnificent adventure !

Reviewed on 17 Nov 2014 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


The whole thing was great, but one of the most memorable experiences was walking through the jungle at Chitwan, spotting animals. We saw various birds, crocodiles and even a rhino! And also the drive from Pokhara to Kathmandu; so much to see.

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Book it! And take insect repellent.

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?


Absolutely. Everything was done locally, and the guides were great at imparting
knowledge about the local area and customs.

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


Five out of five. The tour group went above and beyond.

Reviewed on 07 Dec 2014 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


Obviously, seeing the Himalaya mountains was very special and beautiful and breathtaking. But I think I liked the cultural part of Nepal best. I had not expected such a wealth of history and monumental sights. The Durbar Squares of Kathmandu, Patan and Bhaktapur are amazing (they are all UNESCO world heritage sites). Also, I loved the interaction with the people and their culture everywhere in the cities, towns and rural areas.

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Find out in advance what you really would like to do and see. The travel agencies can help you to individualize your trip or to make changes in the Itinerary so you can really do what you like. There is a lot of tourism in Nepal which makes it is easy to travel in Nepal on your own. So make sure, you don't plan every minute in advance but to leave some room for spontaneous decisions when you are there. And: definitely go trekking for at least 3-4 days!

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?


The travel agency was run by local people and only hired local people, used local restaurants and hotels (as far as I can judge that). So it certainly benefited the local people and business. In addition, I know that the owners of the travel agency give back to the community by supporting eg local schools. There is awareness of environmental impact but I am not sure how my travel helped reducing impact or supported conservation.

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


Nepal is a very fascinating country with lots to offer. Nature, Culture, People. It's chaotic, loud, polluted, crazy in the cities and quiet, pure and serene in the countryside. There is a lot of history and things to see. It is fascinating that you can travel from the hot, flat jungle with amazing wildlife to towns with palaces and loads of cultural sites or to snow-covered, cool mountains in less than a day.

Reviewed on 01 Dec 2013 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


The whole experience, it was so full of adventure and different sights and experiences from beginning to end

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Donít expect everything on itinerary to stay as planned and donít expect there necessarily to be a group of people on your trip

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?


Yes, definitely, the company utilized local businesses and local people

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


Excellent. Go to Nepal

Reviewed on 29 Mar 2013 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


Chitwan NP... an encounter with a rhino while on a walk. Pretty amazing watching one of these animals come out of the bush, and your there with your guide and helper, each with nothing more than sticks, looking at these large endangered species... won't forget that!

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Trekking means different things to different people. When someone thinks they can do a trek, they should understand what they are getting themselves into in Nepal, or Bhutan. These are big mountains were talking about! It wasn't a problem for me (i did what they call the comfort trek), but i did hear of stories where people sign up for an extended trek, that is well beyond their ability.

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?


I think anytime anyone goes to another country, there are benefits made to the country and citizens there. We are helping employ people, develop services and build a growing industry that is in itself sustainable. I would say Chitwan NP would be the best example of my trip on conservation... itís a great park, but if people don't go and visit, would it still be as protected and sustainable as it is today?

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


Excellent... really liked what the tour company put together, and feel they delivered on everything they said they would. Would have no problem recommending them to anyone.

Reviewed on 30 May 2012 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


Many Thanks to Achut and his team for treating me so well from our first email contact to our last moment at the airport. The responses from the agency were the most prompt and professional. The tours itself were handled extremely professionally. The 6 days trekking was amazing. It was wonderful to walk through out the lovely villages meeting people and also the beauty of the countryside and experiencing breath taking views of the mountains. Trekking was the ideal way to experience all of this. My guide was perfect and a sensitive host and along with our porter I felt like a little family at the end.

As a single woman traveling on my own, I especially appreciated being in such good hands. I had confidence to travel to Nepal, by myself with Achutís help. He arranged all travel and hotels while in Nepal. It is a destination unlike any other. I highly recommend this operator for their tour in Nepal. Many thanks Achut and your team, for a thousand of unforgettable impressions.

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Articles important to bring, shampoo, soap and towels, for the children; pencils and paper.

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, reduced environmental impacts or supported conservation?




4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?



Reviewed on 17 May 2010 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


The most memorable parts of the holiday were all the wonderful people that I met throughout Nepal, the interest that they showed in me and the help and advice that they gave me.

The most exciting parts of the holiday were going on safari on foot, dugout canoe and by jeep, seeing a tiger close by, and getting up to see the sunrise over the Himalaya.

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Journeys by car through the mountains and across the country are lengthy, frustrating and feel dangerous. Internal flights seem much safer and save a huge amount of time. For example I took a very unpleasant 7 hour car journey from Kathmandu to Chitwan. I flew back for $86 in 19 minutes!

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, and minimized impacts on the environment?


Yes, I employed a guide and porter. I was able to purchase a variety of souvenirs from craftsmen in the villages that we walked through

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


A tremendous, and sometimes challenging, experience. Nepal is a varied and interesting country with magnificent landscapes, interesting cultures and wonderful people.

There are the usual frustrations eg sporadic electricity and hot water, strikes but these have to be put in perspective. Keshav and Achut from the tour operator were extremely helpful and changed my flexible itinerary as required

Reviewed on 08 Apr 2010 by

1. What was the most memorable or exciting part of your holiday?


The most exciting part of the trip was going on a walking safari in Chitwan and whilst grumbling about never really seeing any wildlife suddenly coming right on top of a mother rhino with her baby in the long grass. We had been told to run like mad in a zig zag fashion and despite the heat we did run very fast indeed. Which brought home to us that really we were not expecting to see sloth bears or tigers during out walk, well not if we wanted to return intact in the evening. The real aim was to see some wild peacocks or hornbills or maybe some large lizards and so on. Once we were safe we laughed for ages at our foolishness.

The other memorable part of the trip was staying the night in Banthanti. There are actually two villages on the trail called Banthanti and this one is just three small teahouses where generally people only stop for lunch. The village has only one feature worth signposting and that is the tap, yes there is just the one and its in an outbuilding that poses as a shower, but you would need to fill a bucket from the tap and throw the cold water over yourself to have a "shower". We stayed the night and it was the most peaceful night of the trip. There was only the five from our party and the families who lived in the teahouses. There is no electricity in the village not even by generator and the silence and the stars and the good company of our innkeepers will stay with me forever.

2. What tips would you give other travellers booking this holiday?


Donít bring too many clothes with you. Check what the weather is like and be aware that you are going to a maximum elevation of 3200 m so you will probably not need cold weather gear. We went in March and the coldest part was at Gandruk/Poon Hill where on the trek to the top of Poon Hill in the dark there was a light ground frost at the top of the hill. But most of the time we were sweltering in the heat so a light fleece was really all that was needed. Also you donít really need to bring a sleeping bag. All of the teahouses will offer you a blanket (a sort of nepali duvet) and this is all you need to keep you warm. Bring a sleeping bag liner and that will be all you need.

You are going to be asking someone who is much smaller than you to carry all of your (and at least one other persons) gear, which feels really odd. It made me feel very uncomfortable watching a very small man in a pair of cheap trainers struggle up the hill carrying our gear while us strapping Europeans in our state of the art walking boots strode out ahead of him. It will make you feel worse if you have brought huge amounts of gear with you so leave it at home. You can wash out your clothes most nights and the heat means it is dry in the morning. This means two of everything is all you need. If you want extra items for other parts of your trip leave them at the hotel in Pokhara to pick up on your return.

Other tips are that it will not be as cheap out there as you expect. The Nepalis expect to discriminate against you. Most things are priced either for Nepalis (cheap), for SAARC countries (fairly cheap), or for Foreigners (fairly expensive). Sometimes this is explicit as on the charging policy to see monuments, or sometimes printed as a pricing policy for hotels. But most of the time you only get to see the Foreigner price, after all you wont be able to read Nepali script so you can only read the prices generally if it is printed for Foreigners. In town expect to pay £3-4 for a bottle of beer and that will increase the further up the mountain you go. Also be aware you are expected to substantially tip the porter and the guide and the driver etc, this is not really optional. Anyway even if you feel poor at home when you are in Nepal you realise you are very privileged and will want to give a decent amount of money to the staff as I donít think they get much pay apart from your tips.

Be aware as well that although generally the Nepalis are friendly they are also often resentful of the strapping great rich fools who pointlessly walk up and down the mountains when they donít need to. Our guide spent a lot of time laughing at us with the girls at the teahouses and it can get a bit wearing being laughed at all the time, especially as although they are clearly doing it you have not idea what they are saying so cannot really comment on it. That said mostly you will feel safe in Nepal even walking alone at night and lots of people do speak English and are happy to have a chat so enjoy your time there.

3. Did you feel that your holiday benefited local people, and minimized impacts on the environment?


Before going it was sort of drummed into me to avoid if at all possible drinking mineral water in plastic bottles while on the trek. It is a real problem disposing of the bottles and they are starting to build up in the mountain areas where there is nowhere to dispose of them. However it is incredibly hard to avoid drinking mineral water as the guides will tell you never to drink the water and treat you as if you are mad and cheap if you try to avoid drinking bottled water. I saw people offering to sell filtered boiled water only twice on the trek, and generally the tourist trade expects you to buy bottled water so they can make some money. It will cost up to £1 per bottle in the mountains so as its hot and you are exercising so madly you will need to buy quite a lot of water, the price reflects the fact that some poor person has had to carry the bottle on their back all the way up the mountain for you to drink.

At Chitwan we were told we would be provided with boiled water to drink but could buy mineral water. When I asked for water the waiter looked at me as if I was mad and then said he would bring some later but never did. When I asked again I got the same response so gave up and bought mineral water. If I go again I will try to research more on how to purify water to stop needing to create all of this plastic waste.

The Nepalis clearly need tourists to keep their massively increasing population going. It is clear when travelliing around the country the sudden massive rises in population are a disaster for everyone and everything in Nepal. Every crook and cranny of land is farmed or built on. There is no way the population can support themselves by farming as the numbers of people has so far outstripped the ability of the land to support them. Without tourists there would be terrible famines so I suppose you could say that tourists keep the country going.

4. Finally, how would you rate your holiday overall?


It is very strange to be a tourist in a third world country. You are tossed about by the thoughts of how unfair it is you are so rich and confused about how to help. You are advised not to give to beggars as this was not a typical part of Nepali culture in the past but now there are ever increasing numbers of beggars who particularly target Foreigners. This is not what the country wants to encourage but it makes you feel really bad saying no to people who may very well be desperate. I couldnít stop myself giving to beggars sometimes and will look for a suitable charity to support now I am home again. It is also very uncomfortable asking other people to carry your bags for you, if I went again I would go with friends and wouldnít use a porter or guide. I know they want you to use them, but actually all parties find it a difficult relationship and you would never dream of walking in the hills of Europe and asking some young man to walk in front of you to show you the way and some other behind carrying your bags.

That said this was a good holiday for the time poor who want to see a bit of everything in Nepal There was sightseeing laid on in Kathmandu to all the important sites and some time in the lovely city of Pokhara. Hotels were booked for you and a driver always there to pick you up after your trek or travels. Then there was the safari trek so we did a bit of everything and didnít need to worry about sorting anything out for ourselves as someone had already done it all for us. Given the three tier pricing system you would probably find booking your own rooms and taxis would cost a lot more than you expect so the cost of the holiday probably represents pretty good value. And despite the uncomfortable feelings about the guide and porter system our porter was lovely and explained lots of things about Nepal and the people and I guess I would have missed a lot without his insight and information. So given how the people are very dependent on tourism maybe it does make sense to travel this way.

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