Best time to visit Comoros

The Comoros’ tropical climate sees these islands basking in warm temperatures all year round, though come from April to November for the driest and balmiest conditions.
Tailor made holidays run all year round, but April to November is the best time to visit Comoros as this is the driest season. In common with its more famous Indian Ocean sisters Mauritius and the Seychelles, Comoros enjoys a tropical climate, influenced by southeast trade winds and monsoons from the northwest. There are basically two seasons: the dry and cool season from May to October and the hot and humid season, from November to April, although temperatures don’t fluctuate greatly. Expect warm conditions all year round, typically 24°C to 29°C. Comoros can be affected by tropical cyclones between January and May.

Comoros Weather Chart

 
MIN °C
MAX °C
RAIN (mm)
JAN
21
27
337
FEB
21
27
291
MAR
20
27
274
APR
20
27
280
MAY
19
26
213
JUN
18
25
167
JUL
17
24
183
AUG
16
24
130
SEP
17
25
70
OCT
18
26
101
NOV
19
27
107
DEC
20
27
211

Things to do in Comoros

Things to do in Comoros…

Mohéli is one of East Africa’s major sea turtle nesting sites, where you’re virtually guaranteed to see turtles at any time of the year, either nesting, hatching or simply gliding past as you snorkel. It’s also home to the rare, highly endangered and endemic Livingstone’s fruit bats (there are some on Anjouan, too). Also known as the Comoro flying fox, these impressive creatures have a huge wingspan of about 1.5m and bright orange eyes glowing from a black furry face. Combine the Comoros with other remote islands – some organised tours take in Reunion and Mayotte, too. Volcanic Reunion lies to the east of Madagascar, and is home to spice and vanilla plantations, lush scenery and vibrant Creole culture (including excellent local rum). Mayotte, which remained under French rule when the other three Comoros Islands chose independence, is a lovely place to relax, home to old markets, clove plantations and superb beaches on its eastern coast. Forget the Indian Ocean island holiday stereotypes. Sure, the Comoros has lots of blissful beaches, and trips here build in plenty of time to relax, swim and snorkel, but it’s worth packing your walking boots, too, as the Comoros has lots of opportunities for active exploration. There are hiking trails on all the islands, often winding through tracks of virgin rainforest. You can take a two-day hike up Mount Karthala, the active volcano in the south of Grande Comore, or admire the views from the top of Mount Ntingui rising 1,595m over Anjouan. Biking on Mohéli is fun, too – its roads are virtually empty.

Things not  to do in Comoros…

Expect people to speak English. There are three official languages in the Comoros. The national language is Shikomori – a dialect of Swahili and Arabic – plus French and Arabic. Lots of significantly different dialects are also spoken around the islands, but English is only spoken by a small minority of the population. Bring your credit card. The Comoros is a cash economy and the currency is the Comoros franc. The Comoros has barely any established tourism infrastructure, so don’t expect standards on a par with the Seychelles. Electricity and water supplies are subject to frequent interruptions, roads are often poor and bumpy, and accommodation can be simple and rustic. This is all part of the unspoilt charm of the Comoros, so simply relax and go with flow, spend time chatting to the friendly Comorians and just soak up the islands’ laidback vibe. Arab, Persian, African and European traders have been stopping off at and settling the Comoros since the 15th century, so while here, don’t ignore the islands’ rich history. You’ll see it in Moroni, which is steeped in Arabic heritage dating back to the 10th century, and home to the white colonnaded Ancienne Mosquée du Vendredi and a Medina with atmospheric narrow lanes. Sultans, soothsayers and plantation owners have left their mark on the islands, and you’ll find decaying palaces and a citadel built to protect Mutsamudu on Anjouan from Malagasy attacks. The food is a fusion of Arab, Indian and French flavours – think savoury croissants and samosas – while fresh fish and locally grown exotic fruits are staples.

Our top Comoros Holiday

Comoros small group holiday

Comoros small group holiday

Dramatic scenery, Swahili heritage and unusual wildlife

From £1399 9 days ex flights
Small group travel:
2019: 26 Aug
2020: 24 Aug
Travel Team
If you'd like to chat about Comoros or need help finding a holiday to suit you we're very happy to help.

Comoros travel advice

Estelle Hisler, from our specialist supplier Undiscovered Destinations, explains more about the Comoros:

What should travellers expect?

“With only about 12,000 tourists a year, the Comoros Islands are seldom visited. Consequently, tourist infrastructure is almost non-existent and you will find yourself projected into a completely new environment, far from our Occidental ordinary way of living. As for many of the not so developed destinations, the main challenge in the Comoros is to try our best to take things easy and really connect with our environment. When you’re here, forget about your daily routine and leave aside your phone and emails – this is the key to cut down all tensions. In fact, apart from in Moroni, Internet access is scarce and speed is limited. Then, be indulgent – the local guides are trained but tourism is fairly new to them and they do not always have responses to all of your questions. However, they know the places like the back of their hands and will prove to be essential companions and sincere friends. Finally, embrace the typically island relaxed pace of life and you will be rewarded with the wonders that local fauna and flora offer unconditionally. You can also expect to be welcomed by broad smiles on the faces of local people and enjoy listening as they share their stories and traditions.”

How do the islands differ?

“All three islands have their own personality and charms which makes it hard to choose one favourite island. It is difficult to decide in between the rawness of Moheli, the friendliness of the Anjouanais living in their beautifully shaped island and the dark soil contrasting with the turquoise waters on Grande Comore. Maybe my favourite place is the top of the Karthala volcano where, following a gruelling ascent you are rewarded by a fresh breeze and a superb panorama over the giant caldera. It seems to as if the Little Prince just landed on a lunar landscape, far from anything else.”

Why book an organised tour?

“It is not impossible to organise yourself a trip to the Comoros, especially if you are looking at staying on Grande Comore only. However, things get trickier if you would like to visit other islands, too. Tourism is still very limited in the Comoros and little literature exists about the destination, so it is complex to arrange a tour without experience, and without speaking the official languages (English being spoken by two percent of the population). We have first-hand knowledge, have done all the ground research and know all about the awesome places to visit around the islands, so that you do not have to worry about it, you save valuable time and just grasp the best of your adventure. We also organise all the inland transportation and domestic flights, which are difficult and sometimes impossible to book ahead online.”
Written by Joanna Simmons
Photo credits: [Page banner: David Stanley] [Intro: David Stanley] [Things to do in Comoros: Daryl Wallace] [Estelle Hisler Quote: Matt Crypto]
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